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one game a month 2021

in 2021 i challenged myself to create at least one game a month, let's see what happened!


january

distanced

genre: puzzle
made for once upon a blue monday game jam

distanced is a short puzzle game where you control two people at once in two separate locations, trying to get each person to their exit.

click here to play

what i learned:


challenges i overcame:
things i would do different:

february

roadtrip

genre: arcade
made for NOKIA 3310 JAM 3

Roadtrip is a endless-obstacle-dodging-driving-game inspired by the minigames I used to love from Warioware. Can you get to 2000km?

click here to play

what i learned:


challenges i overcame:
things i would do different:

Be a lover & a fighter in this Tinder-inspired deck-building rogue-like! Can you swipe your way to level 10 and beat the Vampire Queen?

click here to play

what i learned:


challenges i overcame:
things i would do different:

Learn the history of Earth's most bestest sport!

click here to play

what i learned:


challenges i overcame:
things i would do different:

The most successful game so far! Survive a thrilling 7 days cutting and dying customers hair for only 7 seconds a piece. Can you pay rent?

click here to play

what i learned:
  • - Using sinosidual waves for programming cyclical animations is really fun and easy. Almost every animation in this game used a sin curve with the exception of some UI.
  • - Having a clear and defined goal in a game in good.
  • - A simple game with a few mechanics done right can be very fun!
  • - This isn't something I learned, but this game is the first one I've made that has gotten a review! So cool!

challenges i overcame:
  • - Making the haircut detection lenient enough to be fun, but not too lenient as to make the game pointless. In the end I think there are some problems with it, but it went well.
  • - I created a custom tool in Unity to make customer hair creation very easy, this was the first time I've done something like that.

things i would do different:
  • - Add just a couple more customer variations, some people said it was just a bit repetetive before the game gets harder. Though I would argue this lets the player master the basics first.
  • - Perhaps tweak the hair detection system just a little bit more.

Shoot people. Puppet their corpses by attaching them to your cyborg neural network. Use those corpses to kill more people. Destroy humanity?

click here to play

what i learned:
  • - You really need to schedule for a two day jam! I had a lot of stuff going on with work/school/personal life, so in the end I only had ~14 hours to work on this game.
  • - No pressure, just release! - I felt a lot of pressure after the last game I made did so well. It feels good to release something to relieve that pressure, even if it could have been a bit more polished.
  • - I used LineRenderer in Unity to draw those cool cords connecting you and your puppets. I think they look really cool!

challenges i overcame:
  • - As mentioned above, I had very little time to create this. To help overcome this I had to cut quite a bit of planned content from release. Oh well, it helped me know what was important to the game!
  • - This is the first time I've drawn a top down art style like this. I think it looks pretty cool. It is good to experiment with different styles!

things i would do different:
  • - I would make movement a bit tighter. I now realize that in games like this you want to give the player the most control you can to make it feel fair.
  • - Add a couple obstacles to the level/better AI behaviour for the enemies. Polish the UI and add a bit more "crunch" (screenshake/more SFX on kills/particles)
  • - This mechanic could have been show cased better in more of a puzzle/action game ala Hotline Miami meets Hitman.

You are a shapeshifter looking for love! So you've decided to make your own perfect match. You go on a dating show and must make yourself look the opposite to your date. The catch? You don't know what your date looks like! You have a limited amount of questions to ask your date to try and determine what they look like and then transform your body to look the opposite.

click here to play

what i learned:
  • - I really prefer making these types of games to more action oriented ones. I learned I really like making nice UI/systems as opposed to programming shooting/enemy AI. At least right now!
  • - Keeping a spreadsheet of data is really useful. The questions in the game are still not 100 percent fair, but using a spreadsheet to keep track was very helpful.
  • - I learned how to make a nice pop up UI!

challenges i overcame:
  • - I had to program a system that was fairly modular for the character customization.
  • - Coming up with all the questions was harder than I thought it would be. In the end I just had to commit myself to doing 4-5 a day.

things i would do different:
  • - I would add a few more questions.
  • - I would make the skip dialogue button more clear.
  • - I would make sure each body part has its perfect opposite. Right now there are "normal" body parts as well. Making it very hard to get a "perfect" score because it is up to chance. This isn't fair to the player.

You are Goshzilla, a giant lizard monster. You are on a date with Moffy, a giant moth monster. Good luck!

P.S. I notice the title similarity with my July game. I guess I'm just on a love kick!

click here to play

what i learned:
  • - This was the first 3D game I've made in 2021 - it was nice brushing up on a new medium!
  • - I made a node based dialogue tree that would be easily flexible for future games.
  • - Making a cute lil' game was really rewarding. Also it is good to make shorter games for game jams!

challenges i overcame:
  • - Creating the 3D village was somewhat tough, being my first real larger scale 3D scene I've made.
  • - To make sure I kept on task I made a quite detailed todo list in google docs. Not the first time I've done it - but it worked especially well in this case!

things i would do different:
  • - Make the building destruction tie into the story more.
  • - Make the game feel more chaotic (the theme was "Let There Be Chaos", and some people felt it was lacking that).
  • - Test out the physics BEFORE modeling the entire town, not AFTER! It took up a bit of time debugging and making things feel right.

A spin on the "don't get caught kissing" flash games of my youth. With a body horror twist! Think cookie clicker gone weird. This game even got a YouTube video about it with 150k+ views!

click here to play

what i learned:
  • - How to project multiple cameras in Unity
  • - How to hook up Unity's animation system with scripts to create an easy workflow for the detecting when Him should see the player
  • - Simple animations can go a long way - I didn't have time to make more complex animations but simple gets it done!

challenges i overcame:
  • - With school starting up again, I really had to manage my time with this one. At one point I thought I wouldn't finish it. But with enough scheduling, anything is possible!
  • - Perfecting the difficulty curve took a bit of testing, but I think it paid off.

things i would do different:
  • - More upgrades? More power ups you could buy?
  • - Have the game work better on different resolutions. The boss can be seen off screen on some resolutions and though it may not be a huge deal, it does ruin immersion for me as the dev.
  • - Make sure to test a bit more thoroughly before building! The first build I had up of this game had the dev mode enabled by default, allowing a player to win the game in ~3 seconds. Thankfully a commenter pointed this out.

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